2023-2024 Academic Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2023  
2023-2024 Academic Catalog

Biological Sciences, BS


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Biological Sciences, BS

Program Description

The Department of Biological Sciences offers the following degree programs:

  • Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences
  • Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Science

Students can focus their studies in health professions (e.g., medicine, dentistry, optometry), molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, conservation biology, and ecology. Students additionally have the option of choosing a program concentration: Biology Education; Cell/Molecular Biology & Health Sciences; or Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology.

Admission Requirements

All students are eligible to be directly admitted into the Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences program.

Biological Sciences Honors Program

An honors program allows qualified students to carry out sustained independent projects under the guidance of faculty sponsors. Students who have maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.4 during the preceding two semesters may apply to the Department of Biological Sciences to pursue an honors program. Application for admission to the program should be made during the student’s junior year. Students interested in the honors program should email the department at biology@wright.edu.

Biological Sciences Program Learning Objectives

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences will:

  • Explain fundamental concepts of biology at molecular, organismal, and ecosystem scales.
  • Explain concepts in chemistry and physics necessary to understand the foundations of biology.
  • Utilize mathematics and statistics to apply quantitative reasoning to biological concepts.
  • Evaluate data using quantitative analysis and graphical representation.
  • Apply observations to formulate testable hypotheses and design experiments with appropriate controls and variables.
  • Exhibit problem solving skills and trouble-shoot procedures.
  • Effectively communicate biological concepts and interpretations to varied audiences orally and in writing.
  • Describe the ethical implications of biological understanding and discoveries.

Biological Sciences Program Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences can:

  • Explain fundamental concepts of biology at molecular, organismal, and ecosystem scales.
  • Explain concepts in chemistry and physics necessary to understand the foundations of biology.
  • Utilize mathematics and statistics to apply quantitative reasoning to biological concepts.
  • Evaluate data using quantitative analysis and graphical representation.
  • Apply observations to formulate testable hypotheses and design experiments with appropriate controls and variables.
  • Exhibit problem solving skills and trouble-shoot procedures.
  • Effectively communicate biological concepts and interpretations to varied audiences orally and in writing.
  • Describe the ethical implications of biological understanding and discoveries.

For More Information

College of Science and Mathematics Advising Center
106 Oelman Hall
937-775-3180

Biological Sciences, BS Program Requirements:


Note: For graduation, a minimum GPA 2.0 is required in all courses with a BIO prefix.

l. Wright State Core: 43 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours


Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours


Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours


Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours


Element 5: Social Sciences: 6 Hours


Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours


Additional Core Courses: 10 Hours


III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 30 Hours


Select 30 credits from approved 3000- and 4000- level courses. Among those selected:

  • At least two courses must include a lab component.
  • At least 20 credits must have a BIO or MLB prefix.  (Up to 5 credit hours of Independent Study can be used.  Independent Study is to be arranged by the student and the professor and can include BIO 4880  - Indpendent Reading, BIO 4900  - Internship, BIO 4990  - Research, BIO 4950  - Honors Research. Up to 8 hours of Honors Research can be used. Up to 3 hours of BIO 3990  - Undergrad Teaching Assistant can be used.  3.0 required for BIO 3990.)
  • At most 10 credits may have a prefix of ANT, BMB, EES, PPH, CHM, MI, MTH, NEU, STT, PHY, PSY.
  • Maximum of 10 cr hrs of online courses
  • Maximum of 5 cr hrs of MLB course
  • Must include 1 of the following capstone or department approved courses:  BIO 4020, 4920, 4240, 4460, 4730, 4800, 4110, 3920 (Honors only).

V. General Electives: 5 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


Graduation Planning Strategy


The Graduation Planning Strategy (GPS) has been created to illustrate one option to complete degree requirements within a particular time frame. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor to adjust this plan based on credit already earned, individual needs or curricular changes that may not be reflected in this year’s catalog.

Biological Sciences, BS, Cell/Molecular Biology & Health Sciences Concentration Program Requirements:


Biological Sciences, BS, Cell/Molecular Biology & Health Sciences Concentration Program Description:

Students interested in studying molecular and cellular processes that govern normal physiological and disease states of living organisms may pursue their B.S. degree in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Cell and Molecular Biology. This concentration emphasizes gaining fundamental knowledge in cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, and physiology. Also, the Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration streamlines the process for students to complete the requirements for admission to medical school or other health professional schools (e.g., physical therapy, dentistry, veterinarian, optometry). The versatile B.S. degree in Biological Sciences also opens opportunities for further education in a diverse array of graduate programs and training in general or biomedical research. Minimum requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in biology include successfully completing the required courses, with a GPA of at least 2.25 for all biology-specific courses, as well as completing university and college degree requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences, BS, Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration Learning Objectives: 

Students pursuing a Cell/Molecular Biology and Health Sciences concentration will:

  • Explain the regulation of fundamental biological processes based on the structure and function of biomolecules and cellular components.
  • Describe how changes at the molecular and cellular level influence all levels of biological organization, ranging from individual cells to multicellular organisms to populations and ecosystems.
  • Identify and explain the molecular basis of heredity, and how changes in genes and genomes lead to changes in heritable traits in families and populations.
  • Recognize the role of genetic variation in the process of evolution and how natural selection influences genes, genomes, types of specialized cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism.
  • Integrate concepts in chemistry, physics and molecular biology in order to understand cell physiology.
  • Implement common and advanced cell and molecular biology laboratory practices to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Critique and professionally present, both orally and in writing, primary research literature in the areas of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and physiology.

Biological Sciences, BS, Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration Learning Outcomes:

Graduates with a Cell/Molecular Biology and Health Sciences concentration can:

  • Explain the regulation of fundamental biological processes based on the structure and function of biomolecules and cellular components.
  • Describe how changes at the molecular and cellular level influence all levels of biological organization, ranging from individual cells to multicellular organisms to populations and ecosystems.
  • Identify and explain the molecular basis of heredity, and how changes in genes and genomes lead to changes in heritable traits in families and populations.
  • Recognize the role of genetic variation in the process of evolution and how natural selection influences genes, genomes, types of specialized cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism.
  • Integrate concepts in chemistry, physics and molecular biology in order to understand cell physiology.
  • Implement common and advanced cell and molecular biology laboratory practices to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Critique and professionally present, both orally and in writing, primary research literature in the areas of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and physiology.

I. Wright State Core: 43 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours


Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours


Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours


Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours


Element 5: Social Sciences: 6 Hours


Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours


Additional Core Courses: 10 Hours


III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 21 Hours


Select 21 credits from approved 3000- and 4000- level courses.

  • At least two courses must include a lab component.
  • (Up to 5 credit hours of Independent Study can be used.  Independent Study is to be arranged by the student and the professor and can include BIO 4880 - Independent Reading, BIO 4900 - Internship, BIO 4990 - Research, BIO 4950 - Honors Research. Up to 8 hours of Honors Research can be used. Up to 3 hours of BIO 3990 - Undergrad Teaching Assistant can be used.  3.0 required for BIO 3990.)
  • At most 11 credits may have a prefix of ANT, BMB, EES, PPH, CHM, MI, MTH, NEU, STT, PHY, PSY.
  • Must include 1 of the following capstone or department approved courses:  BIO 4020, 4920, 4240, 4460, 4730, 4800, 4110, 3920 (Honors only).
  • At least 10 credits from the below approved courses:

V. General Electives: 5 Hours


Biological Sciences, BS, Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration Program Requirements:


Biological Sciences, BS, Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration Program Description:

Students interested in the areas of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology (EEOB) should pursue their B.S. degrees in the Biological Sciences. The EEOB concentration builds upon a broad foundation of biology to explore how organisms function, how they interact with other organisms and their environment, and how species and interactions evolve over time. The EEOB concentration prepares students for careers in conservation and management of biodiversity, wildlife, nature reserves, and other natural resources. By integrating the study of organisms and their physical and biological environment, EEOB provides an excellent foundation for students interested in human and veterinary medicine or life science education. The EEOB concentration prepares students for graduate study in ecology, biological diversity, evolutionary biology, global change biology, physiology, and related fields. Minimum requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in biology include successfully completing the required courses, with a GPA of at least 2.25 for all biology-specific courses, as well as completing university and college degree requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences, BS, Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration Learning Objectives:

Students pursuing an Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration will:

  • Describe and integrate the fundamental concepts of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology.
  • Explain the relationship between form and function of organismal structures and how they are shaped by the environment.
  • Explain how genotypes and phenotypes contribute to and constrain the evolutionary response of species to environmental change.
  • Explain how the flow of material, energy, and information influence the outcomes of interactions between organisms and their environment.
  • Evaluate and interpret ecological, evolutionary, and organismal data presented in quantitative and graphical forms.
  • Use observation, quantitative data, and theory to formulate hypotheses regarding the outcome of interactions among organisms at multiple temporal and spatial scales.
  • Create simple conceptual models that illustrate interactions among levels of biological organization, from organisms to the biosphere.​ 

Biological Sciences, BS, Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration Learning Outcomes:

Graduates with an Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration can:

  • Describe and integrate the fundamental concepts of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology.
  • Explain the relationship between form and function of organismal structures and how they are shaped by the environment.
  • Explain how genotypes and phenotypes contribute to and constrain the evolutionary response of species to environmental change.
  • Explain how the flow of material, energy, and information influence the outcomes of interactions between organisms and their environment.
  • Evaluate and interpret ecological, evolutionary, and organismal data presented in quantitative and graphical forms.
  • Use observation, quantitative data, and theory to formulate hypotheses regarding the outcome of interactions among organisms at multiple temporal and spatial scales.
  • Create simple conceptual models that illustrate interactions among levels of biological organization, from organisms to the biosphere.

I. Wright State Core: 43 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours


Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours


Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours


Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours


Element 5: Social Sciences: 6 Hours


Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours


Additional Core Courses: 10 Hours


III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 30 Hours


Select 30 credits from approved 3000- and 4000- level courses. Among those selected: 

  • At least two courses must include a lab component. 
  • Choose a minimum of 20 hours of advanced courses from the list below, including at least one course from each of the three cores: Ecology, Evolution, Organismal Biology.  BIO 4240 can fulfill the requirement for either the Ecology core or the Evolution core, but not both.
  • (Up to 5 credit hours of Independent Study can be used.  Independent Study is to be arranged by the student and the professor and can include BIO 4880 - Independent Reading, BIO 4900 - Internship, BIO 4990 - Research, BIO 4950 - Honors Research. Up to 8 hours of Honors Research can be used. Up to 3 hours of BIO 3990 - Undergrad Teaching Assistant can be used.  3.0 required for BIO 3990.)
  • At most 10 credits may have a prefix of ANT, BMB, EES, PPH, CHM, MI, MTH, NEU, STT, PHY, PSY.
  • Must include 1 of the following capstone or department approved courses:  BIO 4020, 4920, 4240, 4460, 4730, 4800, 4110, 3920 (Honors only).

V. General Electives: 5 Hours


Biological Sciences, BS, Biology Education Concentration Program Requirements:


Biological Sciences, BS, Biology Education Concentration Program Description:

Students interested in teaching biology in Ohio public high schools may pursue their B.S. degree in biological sciences and upon completion they will enter the M.Ed graduate program in the College of Health, Education, and Human Services for licensure. Minimum requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in biology include successfully completing the required courses, with a GPA of at least 2.25 for all biology-specific courses, as well as completing university and college degree.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences, BS, Biology Education Concentration Learning Objectives:

Students pursuing a Biology Education Sciences Concentration will:

  • Demonstrate current best practices of inquiry and educational pedagogical theory.
  • Design and implement AYA-level curriculum and lessons.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge of pedagogical best practices through formative and summative assessments.
  • Observe and participate in field placement teaching.
  • Participate in diversity and inclusivity training and exhibit correct responses across all teaching domains.

Biological Sciences, BS, Biology Education Concentration Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Biology Education Sciences Concentration can:

  • Demonstrate current best practices of inquiry and educational pedagogical theory.
  • Design and implement AYA-level curriculum and lessons.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge of pedagogical best practices through formative and summative assessments.
  • Observe and participate in field placement teaching.
  • Participate in diversity and inclusivity training and exhibit correct responses across all teaching domains.

I. Wright State Core: 43 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours


Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours


Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours


Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours


Element 5: Social Sciences: 6 Hours


Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours


Additional Core Courses: 10 Hours


lll. Department Requirements and Electives: 17 Hours


Select 17 credits from approved 3000- and 4000- level BIO courses. Must include at least one BIO4020.

  • Up to 5 credit hours of Independent Study can be used.  Independent Study is to be arranged by the student and the professor and can include BIO 4880 - Indpendent Reading, BIO 4900 - Internship, BIO 4990 - Research, BIO 4950 - Honors Research. Up to 8 hours of Honors Research can be used. Up to 3 hours of BIO 3990 - Undergrad Teaching Assistant can be used.  3.0 required for BIO 3990.)

Vl: General Electives: 13 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


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