2023-2024 Academic Catalog 
    
    Jun 20, 2024  
2023-2024 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Psychology, BS


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study - Alphabetical

  • PreHealth Sciences Concentration
 

 

Program Description:

The Bachelor of Science (BS) curriculum offers students an array of courses in psychological theory supported by coursework in research methodology, statistics, and writing.  Students will also select among a variety of elective courses including those related to counseling and psychotherapy, forensic psychology, and neuroscience, as well as applied areas in human performance and effectiveness.  Relative to the BA degree, the BS degree requires additional coursework in research methodology and computing.  In addition, the BS offers five concentrations showcasing our faculty's unique areas of expertise in: (1) Behavioral Neuroscience, (2) Clinical Psychology, (3) Cognition and Perception, (4) Industrial Organizational Psychology, and (5) PreHealth Sciences.  Students considering graduate school or careers in one of these areas are strongly encouraged to apply.  Similar to the BA degree, the BS also offers flexibility for students to supplement their education with additional courses outside of psychology.  This enables students to customize their degree to meet their individual goals.  Graduates prepared with knowledge of human behavior who are adaptable and willing to learn, socially skilled, and focused on problem-solving, will have the greatest flexibility in pursuing the jobs and careers of their choice given the demands of employers in the 21st century.

Admission Requirements:

All students are eligible to be directly admitted into the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program.

Students are encouraged to meet with an academic advisor to learn more about curriculum choices, degree completion requirements, graduate school, and career opportunities.  Because of the breadth of psychology, a variety of educational options are available; therefore, students should continue to work with the psychology undergraduate program advisors to facilitate progress toward their degree.

Program Learning Objectives:

The B.S. curriculum is designed to provide opportunities to achieve six learning objectives.

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, including an understanding of thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups and knowledge in how to assess human behavior and respond appropriately in work and non-work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical (including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family.

Program of Study Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates have knowledge of human behavior, including an understanding of thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups and knowledge in how to assess human behavior and respond appropriately in work and non-work situations.
  2. Graduates possess strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates display strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical (including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they take initiative on group projects, following directions or an established protocol, and are responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate strong self-management skills, the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family.

Psychology Honors Program:

The Psychology Honor's Program is a highly competitive and prestigious opportunity for students to learn about the science of psychology.  Working closely with a department of psychology faculty member, students take the lead in conducting a research project.  Through this supervised experience, students learn first-hand how scientists investigate psychological phenomena.

Students interested in being admitted to the psychology honors program should identify a potential faculty mentor and then apply in their junior year. After acceptance, students enroll in one departmental honors seminar each academic year. Part-time students must complete one honors seminar prior to graduation. All students must complete an honors thesis, for which academic credit is granted.

For More Information:

Program Requirements:


I. Wright State Core: 40 Hours


Element 1 - Communication: 6 Hours


Element 2 - Mathematics: 4 Hours


Element 3 - Global Traditions: 6 Hours


Element 4 - Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours


Element 5 - Social Sciences: 7 Hours


Element 6 - Natural Sciences: 8 Hours


Additional Core Courses: 6 Hours


II. Departmental Core Requirements: 27-30 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030

6 Core Courses (at least 2 courses from Row 1 and Row 2, 1 from Row 3, and 1 more from any other row: 18 Hours


III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 22-25 Hours


  • Two capstone courses (PSY 4100 - PSY 4900) Credit Hour(s): 6
  • Psychology Electives Credit Hour(s): 11-14

Special Methods: 4 Hours


Must take one of the special methods courses

Careers: 1 Hour


One course from

IV. Related Course Requirements: 4 Hours


V. General Electives: 24 Hours


Total: 120


Graduation Planning Strategy


The Graduation Planning Strategy (GPS) has been created to illustrate one option to complete degree requirements within a particular time frame. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor to adjust this plan based on credit already earned, individual needs or curricular changes that may not be reflected in this year’s catalog.

Behavioral Neuroscience Concentration


Program Description:

Behavioral Neuroscience (BNS) is the study of biology of behavior and mental processes. It focuses on the behavioral, neural, and physiological processes involved in perception, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, and emotion. Behavioral neuroscientists study the brain in relation to behavior, its evolution, development, functions, abnormalities, and repair, as well as interactions with the immune system, cardiovascular system, endocrine systems, and energy regulation systems.

Psychology majors interested in applying to the BNS Concentration must be classified as Bachelor of Science (BS) degree-seeking students.  In addition, students must have completed at least 64 semester credits, including PSY 3910 , Behavioral Neuroscience I.  An overall grade point average (GPA) and psychology GPA of at least 3.2 are also required for admission into and graduation with the concentration.  Graduates of the BNS concentration are excellent candidates for graduate work and careers in neuroscience, psychology, and other health science programs including medicine, laboratory science, and public health administration.

Learning Objectives:

The BNS Concentration curriculum is designed to achieve six objectives:

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to behavioral neuroscience and the biological factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a behavioral neuroscience perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within behavioral neuroscience; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published behavioral neuroscience information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Learning Outcomes:

The BNS Concentration curriculum has six learning outcomes:

  1. Graduates understand human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to behavioral neuroscience and the biological factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a behavioral neuroscience perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Graduates use research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within behavioral neuroscience; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published behavioral neuroscience information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates possess ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family


Program Requirements:


I. Wright State Core: 40 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours

Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours

Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours

Element 4: Arts/Humanities: 3 Hours

Element 5: Social Sciences: 7 Hours

Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours

Additional Core Courses: 6 Hours

II. Departmental Core Requirements: 27-30 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030

6 Core Courses (at least 2 from Row 1 and 2 from Row 2 and 1 from Row 3) and 1 more from any row: 18 Hours

In this concentration, PSY 3910  is required, and four courses must be selected from the eight other courses designated with a “*”.

III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 23-26 Hours


IV. Related Course Requirements: 4 Hours


V. General Electives: 23 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


Clinical Psychology Concentration


Program Description:

Clinical Psychology is the study of abnormal behaviors and mental processes.  It focuses on the study of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, by observation or experimentation, with the intention of promoting change.  Clinical psychology integrates the science of psychology with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of diverse and complicated human problems.


Psychology majors interested in applying to the Clinical Psychology Concentration must be classified as Bachelor of Science (BS) degree-seeking students.  In addition, students must have completed at least 60 semester credits, including Abnormal Psychology 3110.  An overall grade point average (GPA) and psychology GPA of at least 3.2 are also required for admission into and graduation with the concentration.  Graduates of the Clinical Psychology concentration are excellent candidates for graduate work.


Learning Objectives:

The Clinical Psychology Concentration curriculum is designed to achieve six objectives:

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to clinical psychology and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a clinical psychology perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within behavioral neuroscience; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published clinical psychology information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Learning Outcomes:

The Clinical Psychology Concentration curriculum has six learning outcomes

  1. Graduates understand human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to clinical psychology and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a clinical psychology perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Graduates use research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within behavioral neuroscience; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published clinical psychology information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates possess ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Program Requirements:


I. Wright State Core: 40 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours

Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours

Required:







Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours

Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours

Element 5: Social Sciences: 7 Hours

Required:

Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours

Required:







Additional Core Courses: 6 Hours

II. Departmental Core Requirements: 26 Hours


III. Research Methods and Statistics: 13-16 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030

IV. Capstone Courses: 6 Hours


Select 2 courses from:






 

VI. General Electives: 24 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


Cognition and Perception Concentration


Program Description:

The Cognition and Perception (CAP) concentration focuses on how the brain works when it interacts with the environment.  Scientists who work in this area have been making a diverse array of discoveries over the past few decades.  In fact, the projected growth in this area is only expected to increase.  Among the more important insights, researchers have shown that humans do not passively register information.  They actively select and interpret what to perceive, remember, decide, and act upon.  These processes occur along with immediate and long-term goals and constraints, whether interacting with people, the environment, or technology.  Understanding these processes have wide ranging applications in education, industry, and government.

Psychology majors interested in applying to the CAP Concentration must be classified as Bachelor of Science (BS) degree-seeking students.  In addition, students must have completed at least 48 semester credits, including PSY 3210 , Cognition and Learning, PSY 3710 , Perception, and PSY 3010 , Research Methods I.  An overall grade point average (GPA) and psychology GPA of at least 3.2 are also required for admission into and graduation with the concentration.  Graduates of the CAP Concentration are excellent candidates for careers and graduate work in cognition, perception, and human factors or engineering psychology.

Learning Objectives:

The CAP Curriculum is designed to achieve six objectives:

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to cognition and perception and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from the perspective of the field of cognition and perception and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within cognition and perception; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information from the field of cognition and perception; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Learning Outcomes:

The CAP Curriculum has six learning outcomes:

  1. Graduates understand human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to cognition and perception and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from the perspective of the field of cognition and perception and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Graduates use research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within cognition and perception; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information from the field of cognition and perception; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates possess ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Program Requirements:


I. Wright State Core: 40 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours

Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours

Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours

Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours

Element 5: Social Sciences: 7 Hours

Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours

Additional Core Courses: 6 Hours

II. Departmental Core Requirements: 27-30 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030

6 Core Courses (at least 2 from Row 1 and 2 from Row 2 and 1 from Row 3): 18 Hours

III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 19-22 Hours


IV. Related Course Requirements: 8 Hours


V. General Electives: 23 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


Industrial/Organizational Concentration


Program Description:

Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology is the study of psychological processes related to the workplace. Experts in the field focus on topics including selection, legal issues and diversity, organizational behavior, training, motivation, leadership, job attitudes, teams and group processes organizational structure, and organizational change.  I/O Psychologists contribute to an organization’s success by improving the performance and well-being of its people.  There is a strong quantitative focus in I/O since such knowledge and skills are needed to design and validate selection tests.  Other areas of psychology, such as social, cognitive, and developmental psychology, have influenced I/O Psychology by helping to increase the understanding of how people function in the workplace.

Psychology majors interested in applying to the I/O Concentration must be classified as Bachelor of Science (BS) degree-seeking students.  In addition, students must have completed at least 60 semester credits, including PSY 3040 , Industrial Organizational Psychology, with a minimal grade of C.  An overall grade point average (GPA) and psychology GPA of at least 3.2 are also required for admission into and graduation with the concentration.  Graduates of the I/O Concentration are excellent candidates for graduate work and careers in industrial and organizational psychology.  They may also work in industry, government, or education.

Learning Outcomes:

The I/O curriculum is designed to achieve six objectives:

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to I/O psychology and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from an I/O perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within I/O psychology; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published I/O psychology information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Learning Outcomes:

The I/O curriculum has six learning outcomes:

  1. Graduates understand human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to I/O psychology and the factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from an I/O perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Graduates use research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within I/O psychology; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published I/O psychology information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates possess ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Program Requirements:


I. Wright State Core: 40 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours

Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours

Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours

Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours

Element 5: Social Sciences: 7 Hours

Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours

Additional Core Courses: 6 Hours

II. Departmental Core Requirements: 27-30 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030

6 Core Courses (at least 2 from Row 1 and 2 from Row 2 and 1 from Row 3): 18 Hours

Row 3:

In this concentration, PSY 3040  is required, and four courses must be selected from the six other courses marked with an “*”.

III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 22-25 Hours


Capstones: 6 Hours

  • Two capstone courses Credit Hour(s): 6
Careers: 1 Hour

Choose one of the Careers courses

Psychology Electives: 11-14 Hours

Pick any course from PSY - 2000 or higher

IV. Related Course Requirements: 4 Hours


V. General Electives: 24 Hours


Total: 120 Hours


PreHealth Sciences Concentration


Program Requirements:


Program Description:

Students interested in pursuing a career in the health professions (chiropractic, dentistry, medicine, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, podiatry, and veterinary medicine) may pursue their B.S. degree in Psychology with a concentration in PreHealth Sciences. The Bachelor of Science (BS) curriculum offers students an array of courses in psychological theory supported by coursework in research methodology, statistics, and writing. Students will also select among a variety of elective courses including those related to counseling and psychotherapy, forensic psychology, neuroscience, as well as applied areas in human performance and effectiveness.

This concentration emphasizes gaining fundamental knowledge in psychology and it also streamlines the process for students to take courses required for admission to medical school or other health professional schools in completing the major. This targeted and comprehensive B.S. degree in Psychology also allows opportunities for further education in a diverse array of graduate programs within the sciences and in other areas including MPH and industry. Graduates prepared with knowledge of human behavior who are adaptable and willing to learn, socially skilled and focused on problem solving, will have the greatest flexibility in pursuing the jobs and careers of their choice given the ever-evolving demands of employers.

Admission Requirements:   Psychology majors interested in applying to the PreHealth Concentration must be classified as Bachelor of Science (BS) degree-seeking student.


Learning Objectives

The PHS concentration has six learning objectives:

  1. Students will gain a knowledge of human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to health science and factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a health science perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Students will learn strong research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within a health sciences perspective; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Students will gain strong ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Students will learn to communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Students will learn to work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Students will learn strong self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

Learning Outcomes:

The PHS concentration has six learning outcomes:

  1. Graduates understand human behavior, with an emphasis on topics related to health science and factors governing thoughts, motivations, and feelings of individuals and groups; they will gain knowledge in how to assess human behavior from a health science perspective and respond appropriately in work situations.
  2. Graduates use research skills, including being able to define goals, identify problems, and develop potential solutions within a health sciences perspective; they will learn to critically evaluate published and non-published information; and they will learn to problem-solve and to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
  3. Graduates possess ethical principles, including familiarity with ethical principles relating to work practices and to the protection of information, including how to safeguard privacy and confidentiality.
  4. Graduates communicate information effectively both verbally and in written form in a concise and clear way; they will be able to communicate technical including statistical) information clearly to non-specialists and will be able to translate data into easily interpreted graphs and figures.
  5. Graduates work effectively in teams, both as a member and as a leader, and with people from diverse backgrounds; they will gain experience in taking initiative on group projects, in following directions or an established protocol, and will be responsive to positive or negative feedback.
  6. Graduates demonstrate self-management skills, gain the ability to define and achieve goals in unclear situations, develop and complete projects from idea conception through final presentation of results or work products, as well as manage multiple, simultaneous demands relating to school, work, and family

I. Wright State Core: 44 Hours


Element 1: Communication: 6 Hours

Element 2: Mathematics: 4 Hours

Element 3: Global Traditions: 6 Hours

Element 4: Arts and Humanities: 3 Hours

Element 5: Social Sciences: 7 Hours

Element 6: Natural Sciences: 8 Hours

Additional core Courses: 10 Hours

II. Departmental Core Requirements: 31 Hours


Students must take either (PSY 3010 and PSY 3020) or PSY 3030.

Students must take either PSY 2020 or PSY 2030

6 Core Courses (at least 2 from Row 1 and 2 from Row 2 and 1 from Row 3): 18 Hours

III. Departmental Requirements and Electives: 10 hours


Capstones: 6 Hours

  • Two capstone courses Credit Hour(s): 6
    • PSY 4100-4990 - Psychology Seminar Capstone Credit hour(s): 3

IV. Related Course Requirements: 4 Hours


V. PreHealth Electives: 31 Hours


Select 31 credit hours from below. Only two courses in ANT may count. Other courses as approved.

Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study - Alphabetical